Amy Goodloe

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Storyboard scene made with 3D app

Here’s another image I composed in Poser, a few weeks before I worked on The Reunion.  This image is part of a series I made for two purposes:  to help me learn the application and to help me “draw” the elements of a story I’ve been wanting to make for a while now.  I had originally planned to make the story as a 2d animation, but now I’m considering making it as a 3d animation (with 2d toon effect) or as a storyboard.  I’ve made a few other scenes for the story and will share those later.

explore-blog:

Illustrator Gemma Correll reimagines that famous Victorian map of woman’s heart into this map of the introvert’s heart.
Complement with the power of introverts, illustrated.

explore-blog:

Illustrator Gemma Correll reimagines that famous Victorian map of woman’s heart into this map of the introvert’s heart.

Complement with the power of introverts, illustrated.

Aug 5

Learning to Draw - July 2014, a set on Flickr.
Between January and June of 2014, I didn’t have the chance to practice drawing, but I got back into in July. Here are a few of the women I’ve scanned in — I have many more!
Chibi-Body1-July2014Chibi-Body2-July2014Girl-Sleepy-HalfLids-July2014Girl-Tude-Hoodie-July2014

Learning to Draw - July 2014, a set on Flickr.

Between January and June of 2014, I didn’t have the chance to practice drawing, but I got back into in July. Here are a few of the women I’ve scanned in — I have many more!


Learning to Draw - January 2014, a set on Flickr.
As much as I love drawing on the iPad, I discovered that I vastly prefer using quality pencils in a sketchbook. These are some of my first efforts at learning to draw women’s faces. Or rather, the first efforts I could bear to share, as some were truly “works in progress”!
MedusaLadyFace-Jan2014LadyFace2-Jan2014MedusaLadyFace2-Jan2014LadyFace3-Jan2014

Learning to Draw - January 2014, a set on Flickr.

As much as I love drawing on the iPad, I discovered that I vastly prefer using quality pencils in a sketchbook. These are some of my first efforts at learning to draw women’s faces. Or rather, the first efforts I could bear to share, as some were truly “works in progress”!

This is my first “screen test” with Thelma and Louise, two little robot-like creatures I modeled, textured, and animated in the amazing 3D app for Mac called Cheetah3D.

I originally created these characters in polymer clay with wire armatures, with the intent of using them for stop motion animation. When I began learning how to do 3D modeling and animation, they seemed like a natural fit for my first “made from scratch” characters.

It took me a lot longer to figure out how to model them with polygons than it took with clay, but I learned a lot about working in 3D in the process and can’t wait to start making little animated clips with these two. They’re constantly telling me their story ideas, but they’ll have to be patient as my skills catch up to their imaginations!

Making Thelma

Most Recent Version

This image (rendered from Cheetah3D) is pretty close to what Thelma currently looks like.  She’s completely animatable, at least in all the ways I wanted her to be, and she can even blink and nod her head.  Now I just need to find the time to make some stories she can star in.

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First 3D Version

After playing around with posing and animating 3d figures in Poser, I got curious about how 3d figures are made and started experimenting with Cheetah3d, a Mac modeling app that makes 3d accessible to “the rest of us.”  This is my first attempt to model a 3d version of Thelma, a character I originally created using polymer clay over a wire armature.

It turns out my first 3d model isn’t suited for animation because of the way I put the mesh together (a mesh is sort of like a 3d armature), but it was fun to experiment with “drawing” in a 3d app. If the mesh had been animatable, I would’ve continued to add details to this model, but I’ll do that on a new version instead.

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Modeling in a 3d app is very much like drawing in a vector app for 2d art, meaning that the figure is made up of points and lines you can manipulate until you get the shape you want.   I find this way of creating art much easier than the “traditional” approaches to drawing, painting, and sculpting, in large part because I’m much more skilled at manipulating software than I am at manipulating a pen, brush, or scalpel!  Now that I’ve discovered vector and polygon “drawing,” I can actually create images that are somewhat close to what I see in my mind, which is a much nicer feeling than trying to draw what’s in my mind and having it come out like a Rorschach test!

Original Clay Versions
Here’s the original Thelma I made from clay (with a wire armature and miscellaneous doodads), along with the original clay Louise.

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The Reunion (a storyboard scene)

This is what I’d call a “rough cut” or full draft of an image I made in Poser, which is an application that lets you pose 3d figures made by others. You can control the scene composition and lighting and you can modify and customize each figure to fit your vision, but you don’t have to know how to make the original 3d figures, which requires a whole different set of skills.

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GOALS

I had a few goals in mind for composing this image. Mainly I wanted to show characters in motion, even in a still image, but I also wanted to evoke a sense of story. Given the title of “The Reunion,” viewers can guess that the fairy and unicorn have been separated for a while, which hints at a longer story. I’d love to continue working with this figures to tell more of the story (of how the unicorn got lost and then found her way back to the fairy), if I can find the time!

Credits

The fairy is based on the figure of Mavka, by Smay, and the unicorn is based on the figure of The Unicorn, by Lady Littlefox. The house is based on the Acorn House prop by Applejack. Mavka and the Acorn House are available at Renderosity, and the Unicorn is available at RuntimeDNA.

Animated Chihuahuas

GIFBrewery for Mac makes it super easy to make animated GIFs out of video clips.  Here are two of my doglets in motion:

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Make a Custom Facebook Chat

Sassy and I had the following conversation on Facebook. (Well, not really. I used a free FB chat generator. Which I’m sure you guessed already.) Again, this was another experiment for a student.

Make a custom text message exchange

I made this for a student using a free web tool for creating your own iPhone text message exchange. Nifty tool for adding a social media exchange to storytelling.

Approach: This was my first attempt at doing stop motion video (in 2012), using dog toys as an easy source of objects to move.

Tools: I took over 100 photos using an Olympus micro four-thirds camera on a tripod, and I used iMovie to assemble and export them in video format.

Lessons Learned: make sure nothing in the environment is going to automatically change over the time you’re shooting. Like, say, a light coming on via a timer!

My first ever stop motion test using clay figures!  When I discovered that I could make clay creatures in earth tones instead of primary colors, I abandoned this project and am currently in the middle of half a dozen others, using the earth-toned Thelma and Louise.